HNBA, Partner of the Ya Es Hora: Hágase Contar Census 2010 Campaign

HNBA has partnered with the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) and ten national associations for the Ya Es Hora: Hágase Contar campaign.  Through this partnership, HNBA will ensure that all persons living in the U.S. are accurately counted.

As the national voice of the Hispanic legal community, HNBA will educate its members and the public at large regarding the laws in place safeguarding the confidentiality of Census questionnaire responses and monitor legislation impacting the 2010 Census.

In October 2009, HNBA issued an opinion and participated on a national press conference denouncing  a proposed amendment by Senators David Vitter (R-LA) and Robert Bennett  (R-UT) that would have added questions to the Census regarding citizenship status.  The amendment was blocked by a 60-39 Senate vote. Click here to read more.

As the Department of Commerce embarks on the 2010 Census, HNBA will continue to monitor legislation that may undermine an accurate count of all persons living in the U.S.

I. 2010 Census Overview

    With only 10 questions, the 2010 Census questionnaire is one of the shortest questionnaires in U.S. history and only takes 10 minutes to complete.

    What: The Census is a count of everyone residing in the U.S.  By law, the Census Bureau cannot share an individual’s census questionnaire responses with anyone, including other federal agencies and law enforcement entities.

    Who: All U.S. residents must be counted—people of all races and ethnic groups, both citizens and non-citizens.

    When: Census Day is April 1, 2010.

    Why: The U.S. Constitution requires a national census once every 10 years.  The census will show state population counts and determined representations in the U.S. House of Representatives.  For example, the projections listed below show nineteen states that are poised to see changes in their Congressional representation: eight states will gain at least one House seat, while eleven states will lose at least one Congressional seat.

    • States gaining House seats:  Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Nevada, Oregon,  South Carolina, Texas and Utah.
    • States losing House seats: Iowa, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania.
    • Click here to view more information about “How the Latino Population Growth will Shape Congressional Apportionment After the 2010 Census”

    How: Census questionnaires will be delivered or mailed to households via U.S. Mail in March 2010.

    English Questionnaire

    Spanish Questionnaire

    II. Ya Es Hora: Hágase Contar

    For more information visit http://hagasecontar.yaeshora.info/

    III. En Español

    Para más información visita http://hagasecontar.yaeshora.info/

    Census 2010  300x250 Button 3Census 2010 300x250 Button 2